“The World, according to the best geographers, is divided into Europe, Asia, Africa, America, and Romney Marsh.”

Romney Marsh   

Romney Marsh The Fifth Continent is known for its natural beauty, the diversity of its habitats, rich history, extensive coastline and its sheep.

With much to see and do, excellent accommodation, outstanding attractions, fine food and drink, varied walking routes and many sandy beaches, Romney Marsh is an ideal place to visit, explore and enjoy. Find out more                                                                   

click on a picture to see it enlarged in a slideshow 


Featured

Key Events in 2016 on Romney Marsh

  • 18 June 2016   Lydd Club Day
    Lydd Club Day 

    Fun for all the Family on the Rype in Lydd.
     
  • 6 to 17 July 2016
    Jam on the Marsh

    JAM on the Marsh is an annual multi-art festival built around Kent’s magnificent Romney Marsh and its famous Historic Churches
     
  • 30 July 2016  New Romney Country Fayre
    New Romney Country Fayre

    One of the largest free events on the Marsh with stalls, arena events and much more. 
    Find out more
     
  • 27 to 29 August 2016
    Day of Syn

    Pageant and Fete held in Dymchurch over the 3 day August Bank Holiday.

The Fifth Continent        LPS
The Fifth Continent

The Fifth Continent Landscape Partnership Scheme aims facilitate the restoration and enhancement of the Marsh’s natural heritage, investigate local archaeological heritage and promote the physical and cultural assets of the area through education and interpretation programmes.
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Romney Marsh is known as The Fifth Continent. Thomas Ingoldsby, the pen name of 19th century author and cleric Richard Harris Barham (sometime Rector of St Dunstan, Snargate), wrote in his The Ingoldsby Legends:
The World, according to the best geographers, is divided into Europe, Asia, Africa, America, and Romney Marsh.

Blue Line

Serve God, honour the King, but first maintain the Wall is an apt slogan for Romney Marsh. Penned by author Russell Thorndike in his Dr Syn novel 'The Scarecrow Rides', it epitomises the fact that Romney Marsh owes its existence to the Dymchurch Wall, which stops the sea from flooding the Marsh.

Blue LIne

John Betjeman wrote about Romney Marsh:

Romney Marsh, on the Sussex border of Kent and close to the sea. Romney Marsh, where the roads wind like streams through pasture and the sky is always three-quarters of the landscape. The sounds I associate with Romney Marsh are the bleating of innumerable sheep and the whistle of the sea wind in old willow trees. The sea has given a colour to this district: it has spotted with silver the oak posts and rails; it gives the grass and the rushes a grey salty look and turns the red bricks and tiles of Fairfield Church a saffron yellow.