“The World, according to the best geographers, is divided into Europe, Asia, Africa, America, and Romney Marsh.”

Lydd Historic Buildings

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Court Hall

Coronation Square, which is located in the centre of the the town, is home to one of the oldest known and smallest surviving timbered-framed court halls in Kent. Built in 1428 Court Hall has two sixteenth century Royal Coat of Arms on one wall.
 

Lydd Court Hall

The Beehive

The Beehive is a simple cottage consisting of numbers 6 & 8 and number 10 (The Beehive) High Street in Lydd. There are three cottages, a shop and a house all under one roof span. The Beehive is dated 1715 with the initials CTA. It comprises two storeys painted brick with casement window on the 1st floor and sash or modern windows on the ground floor. The plinth in Nos 6 and 8 are early 19th century.  Two storeys painted brick with modillion eaves cornice. and sash windows with vertical glazing bars. 

 

The Beehive

There is a contemporary shop front with 2 small openings with  shelf outside, wooden grille inside, door of stable type in 2 sections and flat hood over the whole. There is a tiled roof over the whole block, six bays in all.  Nos 6 to 22 (even) and Nos 26 to 32 (even) form a group.

It is said that The Beehive was originally an inn, known for bare-knuckle fighting.
 

The Beehive Plaque

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Tourney Hall 

Tourney Hall in Lydd is a Grade 11 listed building built c1710 in the Queen Anne style. It is a private house that comprises a kitchen/breakfast room, a sitting room, a dining room, three bedrooms, two bathrooms, an attic two interconnecting rooms and a cellar.

The property is full of historic associations with Romney Marsh. It contains many old timbers from plundered from shipwrecks, particularly in the roof. There is a bricked up tunnel said to be used by smugglers.

There are no doors or window openings in the south west facing wall because it was thought that the black death was carried on the prevailling south westerly winds.

Tourney Hall

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