“The World, according to the best geographers, is divided into Europe, Asia, Africa, America, and Romney Marsh.”

Pubs

Please find what you want by clicking on the appropriate A-Z letter of the subject, topic etc you require.

Ales By The Rails

Locally brewed beer seemed a natural pairing for the famous steam train that winds along Romney Marsh under big skies. So Romney Marsh Brewery has teamed up with the RH&DR Railway to create “Ales by the Rails” – a new brewery beer garden in the grounds of the railway’s Dungeness Station. Ales by the Rails is open every Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 12 noon throughout the summer months.

Bailiffs Sergeant

The Bailiffs Sergeant is the only pub in St Mary's Bay, located in Jefferstone Lane opposite the village hall. The Bailiffs Sergeant is a friendly spirited pub at the hub of the local community, as it provides not only hospitality, but also post office and cashpoint services. It serves a range of Kent brewer Shepherd Neame beers. The pub offers plenty of entertainment - at least once a fortnight there is either live music in a variety of genres or a very popular karaoke night see below. There are darts, pool, cards and board games too for day to day entertainment while a real fire and large garden to add to the comfortable ambience.

Bell Inn

Set in the heart of the beautiful Romney Marsh, this mellow tile-hung inn of 1546 is neatly located next to St George's Church and is sometimes known as the `Stained Glass Windows' because of this proximity. The pub has not always been as cosy as it is today. The owlers and smugglers would give a hostile welcome to strangers drinking there - not surprising considering the nearby church was blatantly used as a warehouse for contraband. The Bell offers a wealth of good food and well kept beers, Mark and Vanda welcome you to their home. The Bell Inn has won CAMRA's Pub of the Year for the Ashford, Folkestone & Romney Marsh in 2016, 2013, 2011 and 2010, plus they were runners up in 2012

Botolphs Bridge Inn

This remote inn takes its unusual name from a 7th century saint who, according to legend, lived and died here. The pub sign illustrates the story of St Botolph's burial, when a group of monks had to remove his body for protection from marauding Vikings. The pub's connection to the local sheep farming industry is in evidence too, with even the toilet signs indicating Ewes and Rams! Botolphs Bridge Inn is a quaint family run pub and restaurant on the Marsh They offer freshly prepared home style cooking, including a traditional Sunday roast, as well as Cask Marque accredited quality cask ales, lagers or a glass of fine wine. In the winter there is an open fire.

Britannia Inn

The Britannia Inn is a renowned pub and restaurant serving fish & chips and other home cooked food. Set two minutes walk from the beach at Dungeness via a walkway opposite, this fantastic pub is in the heart of Dungeness estate, a Site of Special Scientific Interest and home to some extremely rare wildlife. The pub is sited between the two Dungeness lighthouses and within a few minutes walk of the Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway, which dates from 1927.

Captain Howey

The Captain Howey Hotel has a large, bright and comfortable bar area where you can lay back and relax in one of the large leather sofas, sit around one of the tables placed in the lower, quieter area or at the bar on one of the high stools. There is a large screen television showing either sport, or one of the many music channels available on Sky television. All hotel rooms have been recently refurbished and have an en-suite shower room, flat screen digital TV with free-view (100+ channels), stable free WiFi access, tea & coffee making facilities and to guarantee a good nights rest, an orthopedic mattress. The price of your room also includes a full English breakfast

Cinque Ports Arms

The Cinque Ports were a federation of south-eastern ports, the original five being Hastings, New Romney, Hythe, Dover and Sandwich. It was built in the 18th century probably on the foundations of an earlier building. The building of whitewashed brickwork, deep-pitched roof and rooms with low, beamed ceilings, has changed little for over 100 years. The Cinque Ports Arms is is a cosy and friendly welcoming public house with a wealth of oak beams serving upto 4 ever changing real ales.

City of London

Originally called The Seawall Tavern, this was a 16th Century inn. During a storm in 1775, a ship called City of London was blown ashore and collided with the inn, causing substantial damage. The ship's figurehead and timbers were used to repair the building, and the name was changed to reflect this. The pub remains a memorial to those who died in the 1775 storm, and it is well worth a visit both for its historical interest and for its food and drink. The public house is mentioned in the Dr Syn novels.

Dolphin Inn

Traditional pub on the edge of Lydd town. A timber-framed listed building built in the 18 century. There are two bar areas, one a traditional public bar and the other a lounge area with a tv.