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Pubs

Please find what you want by clicking on the appropriate location link below

Royal Oak

This pub ceased trading on 31 October 2017. The Royal Oak, an Elizabethan building of 1570, was constructed adjacent to St Augustine's Church as a dwelling for the parish clerk and sexton. It remained as such until the I8th century when Jacob Ferriss was granted a licence "that he may suffer ale to be tippled in his house, but he may not suffer ale to be tippled during divine service". A lovely old Grade II Listed village inn offering home cooked food and 4 star accommodation. It's main bar has a woodburning stove with a fine inglenook and restaurant area. There are picnic-sets in the narrow garden beyond and quaint views of the ancient church and graveyard next door. Previously known as the Yew & Ewe.

Woolpack Inn

The Woolpack Inn, dating from 1410, retains many of its original features such as wattle-and-daub walls and a low, beamed ceiling. Its name comes from its popularity with `owlers'- wool smugglers - who used the inn as a base for their lucrative trade. The Woolpack is so perfectly old-fashioned that very little had to be altered when, in 1947, scenes from `The Loves of Joanna Godden' were filmed there. Located in great walking country, the Woolpack is a perfect place to stop and satisfy the thirst and appetite during a day out in the country. Excellent traditional pub food is served, with all fish and game locally sourced, and the delicious mature British beef steaks are always prepared to the individual customer’s taste. The pub has two large beer gardens with neat lawns, shrubs, hanging baskets, picnic benches and a barbecue area. Dog friendly.