“The World, according to the best geographers, is divided into Europe, Asia, Africa, America, and Romney Marsh.”

Places to Eat - Pubs

There are many pubs on the Marsh, ranging from old village inns that have hardly changed over the years to more modern pubs. All have histories, with stories of smuggling and the like and offer a warm welcome, and with most serving food.  

Index Icon Bell Inn Ivychurch
Index Icon Botolphs Bridge Inn Burmarsh
Index Icon Britannia Inn Dungeness
Index Icon Captain Howey Hotel Littlestone
Index Icon Cinque Port Arms New Romney
Index Icon City of London Dymchurch
Index Icon Dolphin Lydd
Index Icon George Hotel Lydd

Index Icon Jolly Fisherman Greatstone
Index Icon Neptune Inn Dymchurch
Index Icon New Inn New Romney
Index Icon Ocean Inn Dymchurch
Index Icon Pilot Inn Lydd-on-Sea
Index Icon Rose & Crown Inn Old Romney
Index Icon Royal Mail Lydd
Index Icon Royal Oak Brookland

Index Icon Royal Oak Lydd
Index Icon Shepherd and Cross Burmarsh
Index Icon Ship Hotel New Romney
Index Icon Ship Inn New Romney
Index Icon Star Inn St Mary in the Marsh
Index Icon Warren Inn New Romney
Index Icon Woolpack Brookland

Map of Romney Marsh

Blue LIne

Bell Inn

Set in the heart of the beautiful Romney Marsh, this mellow tile-hung inn of 1546 is neatly located next to St George's Church and is sometimes known as the `Stained Glass Windows' because of this proximity. The pub has not always been as cosy as it is today. The owlers and smugglers would give a hostile welcome to strangers drinking there - not surprising considering the nearby church was blatantly used as a warehouse for contraband. The Bell offers a wealth of good food and well kept beers, Mark and Vanda welcome you to their home. The Bell Inn has won CAMRA's Pub of the Year for the Ashford, Folkestone & Romney Marsh in 2016, 2013, 2011 and 2010, plus they were runners up in 2012

Botolphs Bridge Inn

This remote inn takes its unusual name from a 7th century saint who, according to legend, lived and died here. The pub sign illustrates the story of St Botolph's burial, when a group of monks had to remove his body for protection from marauding Vikings. The pub's connection to the local sheep farming industry is in evidence too, with even the toilet signs indicating Ewes and Rams! Botolphs Bridge Inn is a quaint family run pub and restaurant on the Marsh. They offer freshly prepared home style cooking, including a traditional Sunday roast, as well as Cask Marque accredited quality cask ales, lagers or a glass of fine wine. In the winter there is an open fire.

Britannia Inn

The Britannia Inn is a renowned pub and restaurant serving fish & chips and other home cooked food. A two minute walk from the beach at Dungeness, via a walkway opposite, this fantastic pub is in the heart of Dungeness estate, a Site of Special Scientific Interest and home to some extremely rare wildlife. The pub is sited between the two Dungeness lighthouses and within a few minutes walk of the Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway, which dates from 1927.

Captain Howey

The Captain Howey Hotel has a large, bright and comfortable bar area where you can lay back and relax in one of the large leather sofas, sit around one of the tables placed in the lower, quieter area or at the bar on one of the high stools. There is a large screen television showing either sport, or one of the many music channels available on Sky television. All hotel rooms have been recently refurbished and have an en-suite shower room; flat screen digital TV with Freeview (100+ channels); stable, free WiFi access; tea & coffee making facilities and to guarantee a good nights rest, an orthopedic mattress. The price of your room also includes a full English breakfast.

Cinque Ports Arms

The Cinque Ports were a federation of south-eastern ports, the original five being Hastings, New Romney, Hythe, Dover and Sandwich. It was built in the 18th century, probably on the foundations of an earlier building. The building of whitewashed brickwork, deep-pitched roof and rooms with low, beamed ceilings, has barely changed for over 100 years. The Cinque Ports Arms is a cosy and friendly, welcoming public house with a wealth of oak beams serving up to 4 ever-changing real ales.

City of London

Originally called 'The Seawall Tavern', this was a 16th Century inn. During a storm in 1775, a ship called City of London was blown ashore and collided with the inn, causing substantial damage. The ship's figurehead and timbers were used to repair the building, and the name was changed to reflect this. The pub remains a memorial to those who died in the 1775 storm, and it is well worth a visit, both for its historical interest and for its food and drink. The public house is mentioned in the Dr Syn novels.

Dolphin Inn

Traditional pub on the edge of Lydd town. A timber-framed listed building built in the 18 century. There are two bar areas, one a traditional public bar and the other a lounge area with a tv.

George Hotel

We are a family run business with a warm and welcoming approach. The George Hotel comprises of 9 guest rooms varying in price, bar food and restaurant dining, also two separate bars with a large beer garden. We are situated in the town of Lydd on the High Street near to Lydd airport, dungeoness power station and camber sands beach. Bar food and restaurant served Mon, Wed, Thu, Fri and Sat from 12pm til 9pm. Carvery served Sunday 12pm til 5pm.

Jolly Fisherman

The Jolly Fisherman is the pub for the people who live and work in, and visit, Greatstone and the surrounding area. There is a restaurant, bar food, tv, pool table and regular live entertainment. Open from 12 noon everyday.

Neptune

The Neptune is a large pub on the main coast road about half-way between Dymchurch village and Hythe. It has a carvery.

Ocean Inn

The Ocean Inn is a lovely traditional pub in the quaint village of Dymchurch, found beside the sands on one of Kent's most scenic coastlines. This establishment is locally renowned for its mouth-watering cuisine, refreshing beers and friendly staff. What's more, with the local funfair and world-famous Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway nearby, it makes for a great start, or finish, to a day's exploring. You'll never be short of amusement, thanks to the pub's jukebox, pool table, dart board and regular live music events. At the rear, you'll find the comfortable restaurant-bar with doors leading onto the patio and large beer garden - which is complete with outdoor seating for alfresco dining, as well as a children's play area.

Pilot Inn

The Pilot Inn is a family run pub and restaurant situated a stones throw (and there's a lot of them around) from the sea, in the heart of the breathtaking Dungeness National Nature Reserve. Steeped in the smuggling history of Romney Marsh, its inception followed the luring aground of the Spanish vessel, Alfresia, in 1633. They murdered the crew and looted the cargo of spirits. The ship was used to build the original Pilot Inn and some of the original timbers remain in the bar today.

Plough Inn

Recently (November 2017) re-opened under the new management of New landlord Christopher Waters who is also the Head Chef , the Plough Inn is just outside New Romney on the A259 road to Dymchurch. A real ale pub with food served all day and a carvery on Sunday.

Rose & Crown Inn

The Rose and Crown Inn at Old Romney is a traditional English restaurant and bar in the heart of the English countryside – enjoy a meal with friends or family, or relax in their beer garden with a cool beverage. A popular family-friendly restaurant and bar providing excellent service and great food. They serve a wide range of beers, spirits, wines and soft drinks, including; Fosters, San Miguel, Strongbow, Guinness, Greene King IPA, Bulmers and Biddenden Bushells as well as bean-to-cup coffees such as latte and cappuccino. They are a family-friendly pub, and for the children there is a playground in the large garden. There is a children’s menu, including a child-sized roast dinner on Sundays. When first built in 1689, the property was two farm dwellings, and these two, with ten others and the church of St. Clement formed the entire parish of Old Romney. In 1806 the property was granted a licence to sell ales on the premises.

Royal Mail (Closed)

Closed at present as it is being sold. The Royal Mail, built in 1746, was designed to cope with the increasing volume of coaching traffic. It is a popular community pub in the heart of Lydd. They have four rooms: a single, two twin rooms and a triple (double with single bed) room. Tea and coffee, wifi and TV is provided in all rooms.

Royal Oak, Brookland

This pub ceased trading on 31 October 2017. The Royal Oak, an Elizabethan building of 1570, was constructed adjacent to St Augustine's Church as a dwelling for the parish clerk and sexton. It remained as such until the I8th century when Jacob Ferriss was granted a licence "that he may suffer ale to be tippled in his house, but he may not suffer ale to be tippled during divine service". A lovely old Grade II Listed village inn offering home cooked food and 4 star accommodation. It's main bar has a woodburning stove with a fine inglenook and restaurant area. There are picnic-sets in the narrow garden beyond and quaint views of the ancient church and graveyard next door. Previously known as the Yew & Ewe.

Royal Oak, Lydd

Situated at the southwest end of Lydd, the Royal Oak is a spacious and welcoming pub featuring friendly conversation and fine real ales. Originally two cottages which were joined together (and eventually extended), the pub consists of two large rooms. The main room features a long bar as well as cosy tables and seating around the sides. The second room is furnished with a pool table, dartboard, and jukebox, and there is room for musicians to perform. The pub is run by Trevor and Mandie Brown along with the help of their dog Sasha and a family of cats.

Shepherd and Crook

The Shepherd and Crook Burmarsh is a 16th Century Free House set in the picturesque village of Burmarsh Kent. Amongst our beers, we serve well kept, usually local real ales and a cask cider. Our food is cooked to order using local produce, where possible. We have vegetarian and gluten free options. The Shepherd and Crook has a dog friendly bar and a separate restaurant, which can also be used for private dining occasions. The charming village public house hosts friendly locals, a log fire for those colder days and an enticing sun terrace for those warmer days.

Ship Hotel

The Ship Hotel is a 15th century pub and hotel situated in the heart of Romney Marsh. It has 10 comfortable en suite bedrooms, and an indoor and outdoor bar. The hotel is tastefully decorated and offers a warm welcome. It is situated at the end of New Romney High Street.

Ship Inn

The Ship Inn inn retains character and charm whilst blending the old with the new after extensive refurbishment, completed in September 2017. Open fireplaces, comfortable accommodation, and a very warm welcome. Dogs are allowed in the Bar and Patio area. The menu is seasonally inspired, with good, honest, wholesome pub food and changing specials to tantalise your taste buds! The kitchen is happy to cater for all kinds of dietary requirements and given enough notice, will design dishes to suit all your needs. There is complimentary car parking onsite, patio garden to the rear of the pub, special requirements catered for. Children welcome.

Star Inn

The Star Inn, known as "The Star", was built during the reign of Edward IV in the year 1476. When first built, the house was a thatched farm dwelling. Following the custom of the time, it was given this religious name being the closest inn to St Mary's Church, within the precincts of the parish. In more recent times the famous playwright Noel Coward lived next door to The Star and wrote his first successful play there. The Star has seen and undergone many changes since it was first built, but its historic character remains unchanged. Today the pub is a very successful inn offering good food and accommodation.

Warren Inn

The Warren Inn was first licenced about 1860 and still retains its Victorian interior. It is a cosy and welcoming pub with a lovely log-burning open fire and a wood-burning stove - and they even have a resident ghost called Old Sid! The pub has a large and spacious garden overlooking the fields that run down to the sea. A children’s delight with swings and a play house, there is also plenty of room for tables to be well-spaced, the marquee to be put up and the outside bar to be opened for special occasions. The Warren takes its name from the fenced area behind it; itself named after a Roman expression for an enclosure.

Woolpack Inn

The Woolpack Inn, dating from 1410, retains many of its original features such as wattle-and-daub walls and a low, beamed ceiling. Its name comes from its popularity with `owlers'- wool smugglers - who used the inn as a base for their lucrative trade. The Woolpack is so perfectly old-fashioned that very little had to be altered when, in 1947, scenes from `The Loves of Joanna Godden' were filmed there. Located in great walking country, the Woolpack is a perfect place to stop and satisfy the thirst and appetite during a day out in the country. Excellent traditional pub food is served, with all fish and game locally sourced, and the delicious mature British beef steaks are always prepared to the individual customer’s taste. The pub has two large beer gardens with neat lawns, shrubs, hanging baskets, picnic benches and a barbecue area.